Friday, December 19, 2014

Blamed blog tour - Spotlight

Title: Blamed
Author: Edie Harris
Publisher: Harlequin Carina Press
Pages: 155
Genre: Romantic Suspense/Espionage
Format: Kindle
Purchase at AMAZON
Born into a long line of spies, sanctioned killers and covert weapons developers, Beth Faraday carried out her first hit-for-hire when she was still a teenager.

That part of her life—the American spy royalty part—ended one year ago, with a job gone wrong in Afghanistan. The collateral damage she caused with a single shot was unfathomable and, for Beth, unforgiveable. She’s worked hard to build a new life for herself, far away from the family business. But someone, somewhere, hasn’t forgotten what Beth did in Kabul. And they want revenge.

As the Faraday clan bands together to defend Beth and protect their legacy, Beth is forced to flee her new home with the unlikeliest of allies—MI6 agent Raleigh Vick, the only man she’s ever loved. And the one she thought she’d killed in the desert.
Book Excerpt:
The blood in her mouth tasted like hot pennies.
Flinching as a secondary arterial spray lashed her face, she kept her fingers clenched in her tormenter’s hair, holding his head aloft for the slice of the blade she’d stolen from his toolkit when his back was turned.
That mistake had just cost him his life.
Her stomach lurched, and she shoved the dead man away, wishing he’d deafened her when he boxed her ears on the second—third?—day, so she couldn’t hear the back of his skull hit the concrete floor with a sickening thwack. Her hand shook, the knife threatening to slip from her mangled fingers, but once it fell, she knew she wouldn’t be able to pick it back up, and she couldn’t afford to be weaponless. Injured knuckles white around the slick rubber grip, she staggered back until her shoulders hit the far wall of her prison.
Her torture chamber.
The blood cooling on her face ratcheted her panic up a notch. Every breath was pure agony, broken ribs prodding like iron pokers against her lungs. Every square inch of skin on her back burned like hellfire. Her body was one giant bruise, her mind a tangled mess. Tears spilled down her cheeks, wet and warm—and silent.
She’d not made a sound when she slit her captor’s throat. Her family would be so proud.
The thought made her tears fall faster. A longing for home and the Queen Anne Victorian in which she’d grown up, the same longing she had buried deep for the past year, threatened to bring her to her knees, but no. No. It was just like the knife—if she fell, she’d never get back up, and eventually, someone was going to come looking for the man she had killed.
John. He’d told her his name was John, but surely that was a lie. Monsters never told the truth.
Swallowing her nausea, she stumbled toward John’s crumpled body. The thick pool of blood was unavoidable, though she shuddered when red seeped between her bare toes. Dizziness swamped her when she dropped into a crouch, the hand not holding the blade searching the pockets of John’s cargos for his key card.
Her victory upon locating the card was short-lived when she remembered what came next.
Each time John had “visited” her, it had become harder and harder to stay conscious. Everything in her hurt as she’d never hurt before. The temptation to let her eyes slide shut forever had been so strong, John singing soothingly while he disinfected his tools from their session.
Lullabies. He sang her lullabies. Rock-a-bye baby, on the tree top….
She had always remained awake long enough to watch him leave, knowing he’d be back to resume her torture. The key card was merely half the equation when it came to unlocking the door. John’s fingerprint was the other.
When the wind blows, the cradle will rock….
Dragging John’s body to the scanner mounted next to the door was not an option, not in her weakened state. Her gaze caught on his limp hand, and a tremor wracked her. There was no choice. Flattening his palm against the bloody floor, she lowered the knife.
When the bough breaks, the cradle will fall….
She couldn’t help it—she vomited. But when her retching ceased, she gingerly picked up the severed finger and rose from her crouch. She almost didn’t feel the wetness underfoot anymore, which meant blessed numbness had nearly arrived. Key card first, then the bloody print on the scanner’s screen, and she held her breath.
And down will come baby, cradle and
The near-silent snick of the steel door unlatching shook John’s voice from her head. Freedom. Oh, God, freedom from this hellhole was so close, so amazingly close she was dizzy with it.
Her tears fell harder. Fuck. Why couldn’t she stop crying?
With a soft whirring noise, the door slid open, and a bunker-style hallway cast in eerie greenish light was revealed. She was underground, as suspected. A memory flashed, of John using a medical scalpel to dig the GPS tracker out from behind her ear. There had been nothing clinical or precise in how he’d wielded that blade.
Can’t have them finding you before we’re done here, little girl.
She didn’t bother looking back at his lifeless form as she eased through the door, still clutching his finger and key card. They might still prove useful in helping her escape this prison; John would not.
Adjusting her grip on the knife, she crept down the hall, ignoring the black spots clouding her vision and the vicious pounding of her head. It felt as though her brain were trying to punch its way through her skull, and she simply didn’t have time for that nonsense, because someone was watching her. Her hazy thoughts pictured the camera mounted in the corner of her cell, its little red dot blinking, always blinking. Someone would know what she’d done to John, and she refused to wait for retaliation to find her.
Run now. Collapse later.
The concrete was cold beneath her sticky, blood-soaked feet, with a chill that crept up her ankles, her calves, making her knees knock together. She was so tired. It had been at least a day since John had given her anything to drink, and he’d never provided food. As she slowly made her way down the empty corridor, her senses began to fail her, the muted buzz in her ears blocking out the faint echo of her rasping breaths. Her adrenaline rush from the kill was over.
Perhaps…perhaps she wouldn’t make it out of here, after all.
A loud sob escaped against her will.
The sounds of footsteps, heavy and booted, broke through the encroaching deafness, and then there he stood in front of her, limned in the faint glow of the bunker lights, a tall man with ice for eyes and a nasty-looking gun.
“Beth.”
She blinked at him through her tears, her relief short-lived as a wave of bitterness
sweeping through her battered body as she saw where, precisely, that gun was aimed. Her voice cracked, breaking low and hoarse when she spoke. “Shot through the heart, and you’re to blame.”
She hummed the rest.
You give love a bad name.


About the Author


Edie Harris studied English and Creative Writing at the University of Iowa and Grinnell College. She fills her days with writing and editing contract proposals, but her nights belong to the world of romance fiction. Edie lives and works in Chicago and is represented by Laura Bradford of Bradford Literary Agency.

Her latest book is the romantic suspense/espionage, Blamed.
For More Information






GIVEAWAY:

Edie is giving away one digital copy of Blamed (formats available: PDF & ePub), ‘I Only Kiss Spies’ t-shirt, ‘Lincoln Park After Dark’ OPI nail polish and one bag of Van Houtte ‘Belgian Chocolate’ ground coffee!· 



Terms & Conditions:
  • By entering the giveaway, you are confirming you are at least 18 years old.
  • One winner will be chosen via Rafflecopter.
  • This giveaway begins October 19 and ends December 22.
  • Winner will be contacted via email on Tuesday, December 23.
  • Winner has 48 hours to reply.
Good luck everyone!

ENTER TO WIN!




a Rafflecopter giveaway



Thursday, December 18, 2014

Title: Night Terror
Author: Jeff Gunhus
Publisher: Seven Guns Press
Pages: 400
Genre: Supernatural Thriller/Horror
Format: Kindle
Source: Author/publisher via Pump Up Your Book for an honest review

Ten years after her abduction and near-sacrifice to the Source, Sarah Tremont struggles to be a normal teenager. As much as she’s tried to suppress the power inside of her, it’s grown dangerously strong and has drawn the attention of those who want to possess her power for themselves.

The nightmare that she thought was long over starts again as powerful forces descend upon Prescott City to seek her out. With her parents and Joseph Lonetree’s help, Sarah must stand up to an evil much more powerful than the one she faced in the caves a decade earlier. But in the end, she discovers the greatest danger might come from the power living inside of her. 



My Take:
Night Terror by Jeff Gunhus is the sequel to Night Chill which starts this thriller story off. While I have a digital edition of the first book, I haven't read it yet - mostly because I have been very busy but also because when I review the second book in a series, I like to see how well it holds up on its own. I thought that Night Terror worked very well by itself. I had absolutely no difficulty following the story as all necessary information is given to the reader throughout the novel - without ever feeling like that is what is happening. The background information never dragged the story down. 

The very short first chapter of Night Terror sets the stage for the the pacing of the book and puts the reader on notice that this really is a horror story and to be prepared. 

There are some really awful bad guys in the book - awful as in truly horrifying. There is the somewhat mysterious shaman,  who is super powerful and evil.  I am a little vague on what exactly the Source is, but still creepily frightening. However, the one bad "guy" that still haunts my dreams is Mama D --- seriously the creepiest person I have read about in a long time. The things she does will give me nightmares for quite some time, I think.

There are a couple of story lines that the novel follows which are related but different enough to keep things really interesting. Sarah Tremont is a special girl with special powers that have been getting much stronger lately. Despite what she tells everyone, she remembers what happened to her ten years before and she struggles to control her powers. There are some evil players who have caught wind of Sarah and her powers and want them for their own nefarious reasons. When Joseph Lonetree shows up, the family knows things are going to get messy again.

The other story line I am really interested in is what Sarah's mom is working on in her secure lab at the hospital. She has some strange experiments going and I can't wait to find out more about that. And just because some scenes take place in a science lab doesn't mean they are boring -- far from it. 

I don't want to give away what happens in the book, so I won't discuss what happens very much. I will say that I found Night Terror to be a real page-turner and I read the last half of the book in a mad dash because I had to see how it turned out. I would say it isn't for the faint of heart -- and I loved every creepy minute of the book. I am anxiously hoping the story will continue -- this isn't finished yet. As I said earlier, Mama D is haunting my dreams and nights are creepier after having read the book. I would highly recommend Night Terror to anyone who really loves a good horror book.





About the Author
Jeff Gunhus is the author of both adult thrillers and the Middle Grade/YA series, The Templar Chronicles. The first book, Jack Templar Monster Hunter, was written in an effort to get his reluctant reader eleven-year old son excited about reading. It worked and a new series was born. His book Reaching Your Reluctant Reader has helped hundreds of parents create avid readers. As a father of five, he and his wife lead an active lifestyle simply trying to keep up with their kids. In rare moments of quiet, he can be found in the back of the City Dock Cafe in Annapolis working on his next novel.
His latest book is the thriller/horror novel, Night Terror.  
For More Information
  • Night Terror is available at Amazon.
  • Discuss this book at PUYB Virtual Book Club at Goodreads.






Thursday, December 11, 2014

Death Logs In Blog Tour and Review

Death Logs In by E.J. Simon
Publication date: October 15, 2014 by Simon/Zef
Source: e-book provided by publisher via iRead Book Tours for an honest review
Description:
Some of the most powerful people in the world want to kill Michael Nicholas. Only his brother, Alex can save him - the problem is that Alex is dead.

It's been almost a year since Alex Nicholas, a Queens based underworld Boss, was gunned down. After Alex’s brutal murder, Michael inherited not only his brother’s business – but his enemies. Michael is now a key player in a world he once feared. By day, he is the head of a Fortune 500 company by night, the CEO of Tartarus, one of the worlds largest illegal gambling operations.

Before his death, Alex invested heavily in breakthrough artificial intelligence software so that he could live forever. It worked. In his virtual form, Alex can communicate with Michael and monitor information - and people - in ways the NSA would envy.

It is Alex who discovers Michael’s life is in danger. He detects plots that reach from the darkest corners of Queens, to the highest officials in the Vatican - and they all want Michael dead.

Michael is now in a race to save his life, but he is never alone - Alex is there to help him navigate through this maze of life and death. Also protecting Michael from the forces closing in around him is Sindy Steele, a beautiful - and lethal bodyguard.

How far is Michael willing to go to save his own life – and that of his family? Guided only by a familiar face on a computer screen, will the information Alex discovers allow Michael to go from being the hunted to the hunter?

My Take:
I was excited to read Death Logs In because I have been an avid sci-fi/techo reader/geek for a long time and  the premise of the book really intrigued me. At first the vagueness of the explanations about how Michael's brother Alex could seemingly still be alive and thriving in the virtual world really bugged me because there wasn't an explanation - just vague references to computer geeks and such. The whole artificial intelligence topic is hot-button topic in our house and is the topic of many of our dinner table discussions/debates. For this reason, I am probably just sensitive to the topic. However, once I let that issue go, I was quickly drawn into the drama of Michael's crazy life.

I haven't read the previous book, but the information necessary was given so I had no issue with past events and I don't think it should be a problem for other readers either. It didn't take long before I was completely enthralled with the strange and dangerous trajectory that Michael finds himself on. 

I think one of my favorite things about the book was finding out just how many people had nefarious plans for Michael and why. The illegal gambling world harbors some interesting and dangerous characters, but nothing compared to the ones lurking in the business world or protected by the Vatican, apparently.  There was danger at every turn. Everyone seemed to be plotting against everyone else and it was just great fun - if a bit anxiety-inducing, as well.

Interestingly, the scariest and most dangerous character in the book was probably Michael's mistress/bodyguard, Sindy Steele. There were other bad guys, but most of them didn't stand a chance against her. I anticipate that she will continue to plague Michael and his family for some time to come. 

Deaths Logs In was actually quite a fun read - and I am anxiously looking forward to the next book. I thought there were some really interesting hints at what may be coming in the next book regarding Alex and his virtual existence --- I am very intrigued. I think anyone who enjoys a good crime thriller will enjoy Death Logs In. It is fast paced with never a dull moment.






Author's Bio:

E.J. Simon was the CEO of GMAC Global Relocation Services (a division of GM) and the Managing Director of Douglas Elliman, the largest real estate company in NY.

He is a consultant to many leading private equity firms and has held senior level positions at prominent financial services companies.

He is a world traveler, food enthusiast and lives in Connecticut. Death Never Sleeps is his first novel. His second novel, Death Logs In, will be available in October 2014. 
Connect with him:  Website  ~  Facebook  ~  Twitter


You can follow the tour here.

Nov 17 - Coffee Books & Art - guest post / giveaway
Nov 17 - Everything Distils into Reading - review of Death Never Sleeps
Nov 17 - Cheryl's Book Nook - review of Death Logs In - author interview / giveaway
Nov 18 - allthingsbookie - review of Death Logs In
Nov 18 - Roughseasinthemed - review of Death Never Sleeps
Nov 19 - A Soccer Mom's Book Blog - review of Death Logs In / giveaway
Nov 19 - Pinky's Favorite Reads - book spotlight
Nov 20 - Nighttime Reading Center - review of Death Never Sleeps
Nov 20 - 3 Partners in Shopping, Nana, Mommy, &, Sissy, Too! - review of Death Never Sleeps
Nov 21 -  Deal Sharing Aunt - review of Death Never Sleeps / guest post / giveaway
Nov 21 - The Reading Life - review of Death Never Sleeps / guest post
Nov 24 - Confessions of A Reader - book spotlight / giveaway
Nov 24 - Cici's Theories - review of Death Never Sleeps - guest post
Nov 25 - Everything Distils into Reading - review of Death Logs In
Nov 25 - Jane Reads - review of Death Never Sleeps
Nov 26 - Roughseasinthemed - review of Death Logs In
Nov 26 - Celticlady's Reviews - book spotlight
Nov 26 - Blissful Book Reviews - review of Death Never Sleeps / guest post
Nov 27 - Nighttime Reading Center - review of Death Logs In / giveaway
Nov 27 - Life as Leels - review of Death Never Sleeps
Nov 28 - Little Whimsy Books - review of Death Never Sleeps / guest post
Nov 28 - Beauty in Ruins - guest post
Dec 1 - The Reading Life - review of Death Logs In - author interview
Dec 2 - Svetlana's Reads and Views - review of Death Never Sleeps
Dec 2 - Being Tillys Mummy - review of Death Logs In / author interview / giveaway
Dec 3 - 3 Partners in Shopping, Nana, Mommy, &, Sissy, Too! - review of Death Logs In
Dec 3 - Jane Reads - review of Death Logs In / giveaway
Dec 4 - Deal Sharing Aunt - review of Death Logs In - author interview / giveaway
Dec 4 - Cici's Theories - review of Death Logs In - author interview / giveaway
Dec 5 - Omnimystery News - author interview
Dec 5 - Life as Leels - review of Death Logs In / giveaway
Dec 8 - fuonlyknew - review of Death Never Sleeps
Dec 8 - A Blue Million Books - author interview / giveaway
Dec 9 - Blissful Book Reviews - review of Death Logs In / giveaway
Dec 10 - Brooke Blogs - review of Death Never Sleeps / guest post
Dec 10 - Dalene's Book Reviews - review of Death Never Sleeps / guest post
Dec 11 - Omnimystery News - guest post
Dec 11 - fuonlyknew - review of Death Logs In / giveaway
Dec 11 - Little Whimsy Books - review of Death Logs In / author interview / giveaway
Dec 11 - The Book Review - review of Death Never Sleeps
Dec 11 - A Book Geek - review of Death Logs In
Dec 11 - Brooke Blogs - review of Death Logs In / giveaway
Dec 12 - Svetlana's Reads and Views - review of Death Logs In
Dec 12 - The Discerning Reader - review of Death Never Sleeps and Death Logs In / giveaway
Dec 12 - JessicaCassidy.com - review of Death Logs In / guest post / giveaway
Dec 12 - The Book Review - review of Death Logs In  / giveaway
Dec 12 - Dalene's Book Reviews - review of Death Logs In / giveaway




Wednesday, December 10, 2014

Sewing Can Be Dangerous and Other Small Threads Blog Tour

02_Sewing Can Be Dangerous Cover
Sewing Can Be Dangerous and Other Small Threads by S.R. Mallery
Publication Date: December 16, 2013
Mockingbird Lane Press
Formats: eBook, Paperback, Audio Book
Pages: 276
Genre: Historical Fiction/Short Stories
Source: Publisher via Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tours for an honest review

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The eleven long short stories in Sewing Can Be Dangerous and Other Small Threads combine history, mystery, action and/or romance, and range from drug trafficking using Guatemalan hand-woven wallets, to an Antebellum U.S. slave using codes in her quilts as a message system to freedom; from an ex-journalist and her Hopi Indian maid solving a cold case together involving Katchina spirits, to a couple hiding Christian passports in a comforter in Nazi Germany; from a wedding quilt curse dating back to the Salem Witchcraft Trials, to a mystery involving a young seamstress in the infamous Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire; from a 1980's Romeo and Juliet romance between a rising Wall Street financial star and an eclectic fiber artist, to a Haight-Asbury love affair between a professor and a beautiful macrame artist gone horribly askew, just to name a few.



My Take:

Because I enjoyed the author's first novel, Unexpected Gifts, so much, I was excited for the opportunity to read the short story collection, Sewing Can Be Dangerous and Other Small Threads. As with any short story collection, some of the stories resonated with me more than others, but overall, I enjoyed the whole collection very much.

The aspect of this collection that I really connected with was that all the stories deal with sewing, quilting or textile arts in general - but most often, with quilting. I am not a quilter, but my grandmother was and I have so many fond memories of watching her work on quilts and then seeing the final result of all that work. I think my all favorite stories were actually the ones that involved quilts.

I loved the story involving the young deaf slave girl who makes beautiful quilts and uses her skills to help other slaves escape. This story was touching and a bit suspenseful, but ultimately, satisfying. The other story that really stuck with me was the one involving the Salem Witch Trials and a curse and a surprisingly powerful quilt. I could list a few more that I really loved, but I think the point has been made. The stories are very memorable.

I also appreciated that many of the stories involve a female protagonist who is creative, smart, and ambitious. In some of the stories, the women use their sewing skills to better themselves or the situations of others. In other stories, their sewing skills are just a talent, but it is central to how they see themselves. Some of the stories are dark, some are humorous, but all of them are stories that make the reader pause and reflect.

I think the collection of stories in Sewing Can Be Dangerous and Other Small Threads will appeal to those who are interested in sewing and quilting, naturally, but I also think it will appeal to pretty much anyone since there is such a variety of genres included in the book. My favorite stories were mostly the historical ones, but I liked the modern detective story as well. I think Sewing Can Be Dangerous and Other Small Threads will be one of those books that I recommend often.




Watch the Book Trailer




Buy the Book

Amazon
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Buy the Audio Book

Sewing Can Be Dangerous and Other Small Threads is now in AUDIO!!! Listen to narrator, Suzie Althens, breathe life and depth into these stories!

Amazon
Audible.com
iTunes

About the Author

S.R. Mallery has worn various hats in her life.

03_S.R. MalleryFirst, a classical/pop singer/composer, she moved on to the professional world of production art and calligraphy. Next came a long career as an award winning quilt artist/teacher and an ESL/Reading instructor. Her short stories have been published in descant 2008, Snowy Egret, Transcendent Visions, The Storyteller, and Down In the Dirt.

Unexpected Gifts, her debut novel, is currently available on Amazon. Sewing Can Be Dangerous and Other Small Threads, her collection of short stories, Jan. 2014, both books by Mockingbird Lane Press.

For more information please visit S.R. Mallery's website. You can also find her on Facebook, Twitter and Goodreads.

Sewing Can Be Dangerous and Other Small Threads Blog Tour Schedule

Monday, December 1
Review at Unshelfish

Tuesday, December 2
Review at Bibliotica

Wednesday, December 3
Review at History From a Woman's Perspective

Thursday, December 4
Spotlight & Giveaway at Teddy Rose Book Reviews and More

Friday, December 5
Guest Post at What Is That Book About
Interview at Dianne Ascroft Blog

Monday, December 8
Review at WV Stitcher

Tuesday, December 9
Review at 100 Pages a Day - Stephanie's Book Reviews
Guest Post & Giveaway at Historical Fiction Connection

Wednesday, December 10
Review at A Book Geek

Thursday, December 11
Review at Book Nerd

Friday, December 12
Review at Based on a True Story

Monday, December 15
Review at CelticLady's Reviews

Tuesday, December 16
Review at Book Babe

Wednesday, December 17
Review at Just One More Chapter

Friday, December 19
Review at Book Drunkard

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Monday, December 8, 2014

The Oblate's Confession blog tour

02_The Oblate's Confession
The Oblate's Confession by William Peak
Publication Date: December 2, 2014
Secant Publishing
Formats: eBook, Hardcover
Genre: Historical Fiction
Source: e-galley provided by publisher via Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tours and NetGalley for an honest review


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Set in 7th century England, The Oblate’s Confession tells the story of Winwaed, a boy who – in a practice common at the time – is donated by his father to a local monastery. In a countryside wracked by plague and war, the child comes to serve as a regular messenger between the monastery and a hermit living on a nearby mountain. Missing his father, he finds a surrogate in the hermit, an old man who teaches him woodcraft, the practice of contemplative prayer, and, ultimately, the true meaning of fatherhood. When the boy’s natural father visits the monastery and asks him to pray for the death of his enemy – an enemy who turns out to be the child’s monastic superior – the boy’s life is thrown into turmoil. It is the struggle Winawed undergoes to answer the questions – Who is my father? Whom am I to obey? – that animates, and finally necessitates, The Oblate’s Confession.

While entirely a work of fiction, the novel’s background is historically accurate: all the kings and queens named really lived, all the political divisions and rivalries actually existed, and each of the plagues that visit the author’s imagined monastery did in fact ravage that long-ago world. In the midst of a tale that touches the human in all of us, readers will find themselves treated to a history of the “Dark Ages” unlike anything available today outside of textbooks and original source material.


My Take:
The Oblate's Confession is a bit difficult to describe - for a variety of reasons. First, it is written as a "confession" by the main character, Winwaed - after living a seemingly long, and full life in the monastery. There are repeated references to the fact that he is an old man writing about when he was quite young. Second, there is an almost stream-of-consciousness feel to the book - Winwaed tends to meander in his writing and follows his thoughts where they lead. And finally, the book is referred to as Winwaed's "confession" throughout the book, but it takes quite a long time before there is actually anything to confess. There is a lot of background information about his early memories and how he came to be at the monastery.

Now, while The Oblate's Confession is a bit slower paced than some other historical fiction novels that I have read, I did enjoy it very much. I was very interested in all the history and the references to different groups of people during that time. I also confess to numerous stops to check out Wikipedia to look at maps of the period and to reference historical people. I was so happy to find out that the novel is indeed very historically accurate.

There is quite a bit of theological and philosophical instruction throughout the book because the reader is treated to the instruction that Winwaed receives from his mentors. This was actually one of the aspects of the book that I particularly enjoyed. I loved reading about how monks of the age actually thought and acted their faith. The novel provides a wonderful glimpse of the changing face of Christianity during this time period.

While I enjoyed The Oblate's Confession very much, I am not sure it would appeal to all readers. I would suggest it to those readers of historical fiction who enjoy the historical aspect and don't mind a slower pace and enjoy theological and philosophical discussions. For the reader who sticks with the book, The Oblate's Confession could very well be that gem that you are looking for.


Buy the Book

Amazon US
Barnes & Noble
Book Depository

About the Author

03_William PeakWilliam Peak spent ten years researching and writing The Oblate’s Confession, his debut novel. Based upon the work of one of the great (if less well known) figures of Western European history, the Venerable Bede, Peak’s book is meant to reawaken an interest in that lost and mysterious period of time sometimes called “The Dark Ages.”

Peak received his baccalaureate degree from Washington & Lee University and his master’s from the creative writing program at Hollins University. He works for the Talbot County Free Library on Maryland’s Eastern Shore. Thanks to the column he writes for The Star Democrat about life at the library (archived at http://www.tcfl.org/peak/), Peak is regularly greeted on the streets of Easton: “Hey, library guy!” In his free time he likes to fish and bird and write long love letters to his wife Melissa.

For more information please visit William Peak's website.

The Oblate's Confession Blog Tour Schedule

Monday, December 1
Review at Broken Teepee

Tuesday, December 2
Spotlight & Giveaway at Passages to the Past

Wednesday, December 3
Review at Back Porchervations
Review at A Fantastical Librarian

Thursday, December 4
Spotlight at What Is That Book About

Friday, December 5
Interview at Back Porchervations

Monday, December 8
Review at A Book Geek

Tuesday, December 9
Review at The Writing Desk
Spotlight at Historical Tapestry

Thursday, December 11
Interview at Forever Ashley

Monday, December 15
Review at Flashlight Commentary

Tuesday, December 16
Spotlight at Bibliophilic Book Blog

Thursday, December 18
Review at 100 Pages a Day...Stephanie's Book Reviews
Guest Post at Books and Benches

Friday, December 19
Review at Book Nerd
Review at bookramblings

Monday, December 22
Spotlight at Let Them Read Books

Tuesday, December 23
Review at Just One More Chapter

Wednesday, December 24
Review at With Her Nose Stuck in a Book

Monday, December 29
Review at The Never-Ending Book

Tuesday, December 30
Spotlight at Historical Fiction Connection

Friday, January 2
Review at Library Educated

Monday, January 5
Review & Interview at Words and Peace

Tuesday, January 6
Spotlight at CelticLady's Reviews

Wednesday, January 7
Review at A Bibliotaph's Reviews

Thursday, January 8
Review at Impressions in Ink

Friday, January 9
Review at The True Book Addict
Review & Interview at Jorie Loves a Story

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