Saturday, January 21, 2012

The Night Eternal

The Night Eternal by Guillermo Del Toro and Chuck Hogan
kindle book purchased from amazon.com
Description from Goodreads:
The nail-biting vampire thriller from the world-famous director of Pan’s Labyrinth and Hellboy.The night belongs to them, and it will be a night eternal…After the blasts, it was all over. Nuclear Winter has settled upon the earth. Except for one hour of sunlight a day, the whole world is plunged into darkness. It is a near-perfect environment for vampires. They have won. It is their time.Almost every single man, woman and child has been enslaved in vast camps across the globe. Like animals, they are farmed, harvested for the sick pleasure of the Master Race.Almost, but not all. Somewhere out there, hiding for their lives, is a desperate network of free humans, continue the seemingly hopeless resistance. Everyday people, with no other options – among them Dr Ephraim Goodweather, his son Zack, the veteran exterminator Vassily, and former gangbanger Gus.To be free, they need a miracle, they need divine intervention. But Salvation can be a twisted game – one in which they may be played like pawns in a battle of Good and Evil. And at what cost…?

My take:
I had high hopes for the ending of this trilogy. I really liked the first two books, The Strain and The Fall and I hoped that the final installment would live up to the other two. I thought the beginning started of well except for the fact that between the events of the second book and the opening of the third book two years had passed.  This took away some of the urgency I felt while reading both the Strain and The Fall. I was disappointed in the time lapse for some reason. I don't know if it made me feel that people were just not as strong and willing to fight as I would have liked or if it just felt like too long a time gap between the books. At any rate, that did bother me some.

I really liked Mr. Quinlan, the Born, and his storyline. How he was created and his mission of revenge lasting for centuries was really exciting and interesting. I would love to read more about his story. Ephraim Goodweather was much the same, only worse, if possible. The strain of having lost his son to the Master and not knowing his fate has turned Eph further into himself and the relief he so desperately seeks is briefly found in his constant drug use.  He has managed to run everyone off with his distance, moods, erratic behaviour and drug use.

The story unfolded much the way I expected and I enjoyed the ride for awhile.  I was really pleased with the direction the story was going especially with the history of the Master and the archangels -- up to a certain point. And then my reaction went something like: uh. . . hmmmm. . . really? mmmm REALLY? I'm not so sure about this. . .

Now, having said that, I can't really fault too much else. Things happened that should have and some that I wished hadn't, but for the overall story, it works. I think.  But for some reason, that particular point in the plot just bugged me and I couldn't recover the same amount of enthusiasm afterwards.  I don't want to say exactly what, but if you read it you can tell what I'm talking about.

The trilogy as a whole was quite good and I really loved how totally creepy and dark the vampires in the books are. I think I would suggest the series to friends who like dark stories and then I would want to know what they thought of the particular points that bothered me which have to do with exactly how the Master was created. If anyone who has read it cares to give me their opinion regarding this, I would love to read it.


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