Friday, March 6, 2015

Elegy for Eddie Blog Tour and Review


Elegy for Eddie by Jacqueline Winspear
Publication date: March 27, 2012 by Harper
Source: publisher via TLC Book Tours for an honest review
Description:
Early April 1933. To the costermongers of Covent Garden—sellers of fruits and vegetables on the London streets—Eddie Pettit was a gentle soul with a near-magical gift for working with horses. So who would want to kill him . . . and why? Maisie Dobbs's father, Frankie, had been a costermonger, and she remembers Eddie fondly. But it soon becomes clear that powerful political and financial forces are determined to prevent her from learning the truth behind Eddie's death. Maisie's search for answers on the working-class streets of Lambeth leads her to unexpected places and people: to a callous press baron; to a has been politician named Winston Churchill; and, most surprisingly, to Douglas Partridge, the husband of her dearest friend, Priscilla. As Maisie uncovers lies and manipulation on a national scale, she must decide whether to risk everything to see justice done.

My Take:

As anyone familiar with my blog knows, I really enjoy the Maisie Dobbs books, so I was happy to participate again in the latest tour in anticipation of the newest book in the series which will be published later this month. This time I read Elegy for Eddie, which takes place right before Leaving Everything Most Loved.

Eddie Pettit was quite a legend in London for his amazing way with horses. He was born in a stable and seemingly since birth has been able to understand horses and is able to calm them in any situation. He was often thought to be a bit "slow", but was loved by his mother and many people who knew him. When he dies in a freak accident that many are suspicious about, several of the men he worked with ask Maisie to look into it. Of course Maisie agrees to help - she knew Eddie and is anxious to get to the bottom of the suspicious accidental death. What seems like a fairly simple investigation soon becomes very dangerous for those around Maisie and appears to have far reaching connections to a much larger political situation. 

As always, Winspear is able to show Maisie unraveling the mystery while she deftly details the political and economic situation of the period. I really love how she is able to bring daily life and economics seamlessly into the story. Without belaboring the point, the author makes sure the reader understands exactly where in history the story takes place so the importance of certain actions within the drama becomes clear. I also enjoyed seeing how Winspear was setting up the historical background for the next book. 

I seem to have a habit of reading and reviewing the books out of order, but fortunately, they can all be read as either stand alone books or as a series. I am very much looking forward to the next book in the series will be adding it to my book collection.

As usual, I can enthusiastically recommend any Maisie Dobbs book, including Elegy for EddieI usually specifically recommend the books to my teenage daughters and their friends because I think Maisie Dobbs is a good fictional role model in a lot of ways. I would say that anyone who enjoys historical mysteries, historical fiction taking place during the lead up to World War II, or taking place in England in the 1930's would enjoy the book.


Goodreads link for all the Maisie Dobbs books.




About Jacqueline Winspear

Jacqueline Winspear is the author of the New York Times bestsellers Leaving Everything Most LovedElegy for EddieA Lesson in SecretsThe Mapping of Love and Death, Among the Mad, and An Incomplete Revenge, as well as four other national bestselling Maisie Dobbs novels. Her standalone novel, The Care and Management of Lies, was also a New York Times bestseller. She has won numerous awards for her work, including the Agatha, Alex, and Macavity awards for the first book in the series,Maisie Dobbs, which was also nominated for the Edgar Award for Best Novel and was a New York Times Notable Book.
Find out more about Jacqueline at her website, www.jacquelinewinspear.com, and find her on Facebook.

Jacqueline’s Tour Stops

Monday, March 2nd: A Chick Who Reads – Birds of a Feather
Monday, March 2nd: Reecas Pieces - Birds of a Feather
Tuesday, March 3rd: Olduvai Reads – Pardonable Lies
Tuesday, March 3rd: Reecas Pieces – Pardonable Lies
Tuesday, March 3rd: A Utah Mom’s Life – Messenger of Truth
Wednesday, March 4th: No More Grumpy Bookseller – An Incomplete Revenge
Wednesday, March 4th: Too Fond – Among the Mad
Wednesday, March 4th: Lavish Bookshelf – Among the Mad
Thursday, March 5th: The Road to Here - The Mapping of Love and Death
Thursday, March 5th: A Bookish Way of Life – A Lesson in Secrets
Friday, March 6th: A Book Geek - Elegy for Eddie
Monday, March 9th: Bell, Book and Candle – Leaving Everything Most Loved
Tuesday, March 10th: Wordsmithonia – Leaving Everything Most Loved
Wednesday, March 11th: Reading Reality – Leaving Everything Most Loved
Thursday, March 12th: Book Loving Hippo – Leaving Everything Most Loved
Friday, March 13th: bookchickdi – Leaving Everything Most Loved
Monday, March 16th: Dolce Bellezza – A Dangerous Place
Monday, March 16th: A Bookworm’s World – A Dangerous Place
Tuesday, March 17th: Reading Reality – A Dangerous Place
Tuesday, March 17th: Broken Teepee – A Dangerous Place
Wednesday, March 18th: A Patchwork of Books – A Dangerous Place
Wednesday, March 18th: M. Denise Costello – A Dangerous Place
Wednesday, March 18th: Lavish Bookshelf – A Dangerous Place
Thursday, March 19th: Dwell in Possibility – A Dangerous Place
Thursday, March 19th: Wordsmithonia – A Dangerous Place
Thursday, March 19th: A Chick Who Reads – A Dangerous Place
Thursday, March 19th: Jorie Loves a Story – A Dangerous Place
Thursday, March 19th: A Bookish Way of Life - A Dangerous Place
Friday, March 20th: Joyfully Retired - A Dangerous Place
Friday, March 20th: Tina Says … – A Dangerous Place
Friday, March 20th: History from a Woman’s Perspective – A Dangerous Place





1 comment:

  1. I really enjoy Maisie's adventures as well. And I'm a huge fan of Winspear's ability to pull in historical details - she does such a great job with it.

    Thanks for being a part of the tour!

    ReplyDelete